Choosing a Custom Wood Flooring Texture

Carlisle’s expert craftsmen can create a variety of handmade surface treatments, each bringing its own distinctive look to a floor.

A recent addition, Texture has become a popular option for customers looking for extra personalization in the last few decades. As wide plank flooring continues to advance, there’s been an increase in creating an older more authentic look. At Carlisle, we lean towards random widths and flooring grade as first steps to achieving authenticity. We then apply Texture to enhance the old feel to your floor further. We offer a variety of textures, and all of them recreate the less than perfect surfaces seen on older floors. Some techniques even use the same tools and processes that craftsmen used 200 years ago, creating the look and feel of a centuries-old floor.

 

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Brushed, A Popular Starting Point
Drawing Inspiration from centuries-old flooring

The original look of brushed Texture took inspirations from centuries of foot traffic traversing old wood floors. Everyday use wore down the soft grain in the grain lines, and as a result, allowed the more dense grain to stand proud of the surrounding grain. When applying this technique to your floor, the boards get brushed 4 separate times. We use a uniquely develop multilayer bristle that follows only the softer grain, thus perfectly recreated the look of a worn floor. If the smoothness of a freshly milled floor is a little too refined, go with our brushed Texture. You won’t regret how it subtle enhances and the beautiful grain patterns unique to each board.

Brushed, A Popular Starting Point
Handscraped Edges Dating Back Over 200 Years
Bringing a original tradition back to your floors

The Handscraped Edge is a 200-year-old process introduced by the original crafters of exceptional floors and now, resurrected by Carlisle over 50 years ago. We start by running a small block plane down the sharp edge of each plank, going deeper in some sections and less so in others. Originally this was done because every plank cut was a slightly different thickness because the watermills of the day were not as accurate as modern-day mills. Instead of leaving a sharp point along the edges, the carpenter would slightly bevel the thicker board to ease the transition down to the thinner board. If you want to create a uniquely handcrafted look to each board and add 200 years of history to your floor, this is the Texture that will do just that.

Handscraped Edges Dating Back Over 200 Years
Watermilled, a New England Tradition
Maintaining the look of the original craftsmen

Watermills once dominated the rivers of New England, the same place where we make our floors today. With logs piled and floating in the river outside, the sawyer used the natural power of water to turn his blade and slice the logs. This crude craft often produced boards of different thickness and even led to variations in thicknesses throughout the length of the board. To create more uniform material, the carpenter would use a large Jack Place to smooth out the surface by hand. But with many chores and not enough hands often random areas would be left slightly rough. These rough areas were still installed in the floor and add a unique historic perspective to the Texture of each plank. Today we still achieve this look during the cutting process, maintaining the history of wide plank flooring in your floors. The saw marks you see in this floor are the marks left from when the board was cut original cut from the log. We then add brushing to each plank to add the feeling of a floor worn into its current appearance.

Watermilled, a New England Tradition

Additional Textures

Learn more about our other custom flooring options.